Daily Divination 10-7-11 New Job? New Town? Is it a Pattern? When in Rome, Are You… ? I-CHING Kua 56 The Wanderer

You move totally away from reality when you believe that there is a legitimate reason to suffer~Byron Katie

As soon as I saw the image [to the left], I thought of Sagittarius – that gypsy and travel part of Sag.  The other thing that came to mind was that famous phrase, “When in Rome, do as the Romans do.” 

Today I learned about someone I know who has lost her job–again!  It’s not any one who turns to me (my services) for advice or guidance; in fact its someone who is rather convinced that my psychic work is associated with the devil.  Sigh!  And its someone who believes (factually in her own words) that trials and tribulations come from the christian jesus and is asking jesus to stop the pattern of giving her life these repeating problems. Yeah, right?  I know!  I’m saying wow and shaking my head too.

Ever meet someone who you so much wish to help while knowing you must be asked, you cannot take over their free will?  Someone who believes that god is punishing and victimizing them?  It’s so frustrating.  What can we do?  We can only envision them healed, whole and happy and try to energize that picture for them I suppose. (And like I do often here, take my frustrating moments and use them as teaching moments.)

And then ask what is the lesson in this for me personally?  Why did this come before me and frustrate me?  And so, until I figure it all out, I use these things as teaching moments especially when they align so perfectly with the I-CHING Kua draw of the day as so happens today.

I came across a quote recently by David Hawkins that sort of sums up religious distortion.  He wrote the following about the fundamentalist sects of any religion about the jealous, vengeful and angry god:

The god of righteous negativity represents a glorification of the negative, and provides for his followers a disavowal of responsibility through justification of human cruelty and mayhem. — Power vs. Force, The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior by David Hawkins

New in town? New on the job? It can be destabilizing and trigger all of our insecurities—change really does trigger self-doubt or anxiety.  Sometimes, in error, we can overcompensate when we feel out of place—we really want to keep it all together but go about it the wrong way; therefore, we can sometimes try too hard and come off  appearing like a misfit instead.   This comes from our own inner insecurity malfunction.

There is wisdom in the advice of the I-CHING Kua 56 called “The Wanderer” or “The Traveler” or as I’d like to call it the gypsy part of Sagittarius.  And that advice is to do as the Romans do and for goodness sake when you’re new to town or to a job,  don’t ‘put down’ the unfamiliar in order to compensate for your own insecurity by trying to feel superior.

Whether it is being a newcomer to a town or  a job or a family (whatever it may be), it is always wise to create a respectful and friendly atmosphere by being sincere in unpretentious—just be yourself in sincerity and hang back to learn the new environment while being respectful to yourself and to others.  Give yourself and other people the gift of grace and time.

Many of the readers of this blog already know this (preaching to the choir I’m sure)  but I am thinking about a particular person/ situation as I write this.  Besides, there might be someone else who can relate to this in a helpful way—so I will continue in that spirit, if I may.

Sometimes, when we are new to town or to the apartment building or to the job, we will be a curiosity to others and maybe even one or two humans could pick on us a little bit to see what we’re made of—that’s human nature.  Avoid challenging established order,  but of course if your boundary is transgressed speak up while respecting others.

We are all wanderers in one way or another on the journey of life.  Seasoned travelers know how to adapt and keep to themselves in the right timing and how to blend with others in the right way.  They also have learned the value of a sense of humor and about the avoidance of arrogance at all costs.  A very valuable took that I read in my teenage years was, “How to Win Friends and Influence Enemies“.  I’d bet there are still copies around.  I can’t remember the context of the material in that book after all these years; however, I do remember it helping me out a great deal regarding human interactions.  I think I was in high school when I read it or maybe age 17 or 18 years old.

Personally, I think that a good way to move through life is to do so in such a way that when you have moved through the town, the relationship, the job or even this lifetime, others will speak well and kindly of you (about you) when you’re gone. 

When in Rome... etc. Also, do others speak well of you after you've left?

Also,  I think that to meet others more than half way (giving more than half) when possible is a good idea. People can feel where your heart is even if you’re words are not spoken aloud.  Of course, I shouldn’t even have needed to type that last sentence— apologies to the reader for the redundancy and overstating the obvious. Some people, however, don’t know about any of these simple common sense concepts and they are having difficulty on their travels.

Some of us may be meant to wanderers as part of our karma or choice —some of us go from one job (or relationship or town) to the next continually–who are we to speculate as to why this might be?   Perhaps there is a divine plan of which we are unaware.  Maybe you have chosen an accelerated path and part of that is to have many changing experiences.  HOWEVER, if you are continually being asked to leave jobs and as a result you are not able to function or meet your  survival needs, and if this happens over and over again, ask yourself if  you are repeating patterns.   And when you are escorted out the door of employment (being fired from your job for the umpteenth time) while you blame jezuz or god (or whomever) for being tough on you (“blessing you with trials and tribulations”) and if you are not taking any responsibility, playing the victim… can you not see there is a pattern there for which your own behavior or decisions (free will) could be playing a part?  I’m just sayen’. Is it really fair to always blame god?  What about self-responsibility?

Not all people who move frequently or change jobs often have done something wrong.  Perhaps you are someone who enjoys such change, seeing it as an adventure and an opportunity for another new experience, then so it is.  I guess it’s all in the attitude.

However, if you feel victimized, consider your role in the plot.  The bottom line is that when any of us finds ourselves in changing conditions (no matter how they came about), it is best to do as the Romans do (at least at first) when in Rome.   When first in Rome, release arrogance, be honorable, respectful and modest and if you want to be a permanent resident, smile and don’t put on any airs.  Journey with your eyes open and take responsibility and make corrections rather than blame the gods.

PS– and should the reader assume that I claim to be in any state of enlightenment … (not hardly).  Someone asked the Dalai Lama that question once (if he is enlightened) and he at first laughed and then said if that was true he wouldn’t be here.  (I’m just repeating what he said.)  Anyway, the point is that I’ve made my fair share of mistakes and have (hopefully) learned from (some of) them.  I’ve seemed to attained my best learning the hard way many times. And like you, am a work in progress.

But… you want to hear something strange on that topic?  It’s not me who is doing any of it really, I’m just watching while agreeing to participate and finding the humor and the irony and the anguish sometimes to–but none of it is really me.  That is, unless I make it too real; do you know what I mean?  How real do you make your life?  And how well do you hold it lightly in balance?  This paragraph is about a few random thoughts that may have nothing to do with Kua 56, The Wanderer–or maybe they do?  After all, I just wandered!

Kua 56 of the I-CHING, The Wanderer, brings a message about how to travel and that is with grace and with humor.  When you are a stranger in a strange land, it is you who must take some responsibility for your behavioral actions; don’t be blaming it all on a punishing god somewhere outside of YOU.  I’m just sayen’.

See you next time…

Hope your weather is good; here the mountains are starting to have deeper color (leaves changing) and it is quite beautiful. 

Cosmic Communiqué 6-24-11 How Open Minded Can You Be about Your Life? Kua 29 – Libra, Scoprio, The Tower, The Devil, Wheel of Fortune

Do you feel like sometimes life is working against you? Is it really doing so or is it your own response that’s the culprit?  Today’s message is inspired by Kua 29 of the I CHING whose archetype correlates with the astrological signs of Libra and Scorpio and the Tarot cards of The Tower, The Devil and the Wheel of Fortune.

Someone I know has great difficulty in her work situations and maintains that every authority figure in her life is out to get her—it seems like a certain paranoia is present in these repetitive experiences that are occurring in her life. Time after time and job after job and for years this has been happening. She has a persistent belief that life is unfairly dumping on her.

Courage is required in the face of dark emotions that have their origin in personal insecurity and repetitive victimization patterns.

These emotional patterns are the right ingredients, if you will, to generate and promote fear, confusion and sometimes panic.

It’s always important not to let emotions take over. Panic has a way of feeding more panic and throws a person out of their center. Being out of our “center” is another way of saying not being in “the now”–being pulled into a vortex or a familiar deep hole. It takes courage to avoid that “deep hole” of repetitive response patterns or learned response patterns.

Many people spend a lot of their life unable to transcend old wounds and behavior patterns and ignoring the many opportunities that life presents to us to create change.

When we are not being aware and alert and not observing our emotional responses from the place of “the observer” we can easily be pulled into the deep hole, repeating past mistakes and not being objective about our life and its circumstances and events.

Today’s message is to become impartial about your life and to cultivate an open-minded attitude. In this way we stay alert and “walk down another street” (see last line below) rather than go down those old, familiar emotional paths.

Again, the astrological correlations are Libra and Scorpio. The Libran archetype involves relating to others and Scorpio is about the depth of emotion and also relates to power issues, betrayals of trust and since it is associated with the 8th house connects with relationships as well. We find, often times, that how we feel about ourselves at the deepest levels is how we perceive or believe that other’s feel about us too.

If we do not think kindly toward ourselves, we perceive that others are doing the same—the mirror effect.

As far as the Tarot archetypes of The Tower, The Devil and the Wheel of Fortune are concerned, I have blogged about these cards and typing the terms in the search window on this blog page will bring up a return of posts on those card subjects. The Tower can relate to events which occur that “test our mettle” as the saying goes—circumstances that seem out of our control but which repeatedly create the same patterned reactions as a response. These seem to occur to realign us and/or serve as markers of our progress. When I blogged about The Tower, I wrote about circumstances with my car breaking down being a particular challenge in my life to which I have been working to respond differently. Sudden and surprising events are always pretty good stress producing indicators which enable us to know what is still unresolved within. As Dr. Wayne Dyer has often said,

 “When you squeeze an orange, you get orange juice because that’s what’s inside. And when you have stress or pressure on a human, you will also find that what comes out is also what’s inside.”

The Devil card of Tarot relates to emotional attachments which are unhealthy or obsessive and the Wheel of Fortune relates to the cycles of life and the adjusting power of the universe—we might use the word “karma” as well. It is in the difficulties of life that we have the most opportunities for growth and evolution and this Kua 29 of the I CHING is very similar, I believe, to the Wheel of Fortune in that regard.

The message is that unfairness in life happens, difficulties happen, and dangers happen too. How we respond to those can be in a patterned emotional way–just  like the lady that I wrote about above who seems to find, in every single job, the boss is ‘out to get her’.

We can break the emotional pattern and by remaining present instead of being pulled into the vortex of old emotional patterned responses and beliefs—we can ‘go down another street’! (See last line below) How do we do that? By noting the old familiar emotional pattern being triggered, releasing personal insecurity, and then remaining centered and objective instead—that’d be a good start.

I walk down the street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk

I fall in.

I am lost… I am hopeless.

It isn’t my fault.

It takes forever to find a way out.

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I pretend I don’t see it.

I fall in again.

I can’t believe I’m in the same place.

But it isn’t my fault.

It still takes a long time to get out.

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I see it is there.

I still fall in… it’s a habit.

My eyes are open

I know where I am

It is my fault.

I get out immediately.

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I walk around it.

I walk down another street.

PS  Life got in the way yesterday and I wasn’t able to blog.  See you tomorrow….